Recommended Reading

Recommended Reading


Okay we got a question from Luka. “I am 21
years old, kinesiology student from Croatia. We can’t learn much on the
college except basic stuff.” Well good. You’re lucky. “Can you recommend me some
quality books about strength and conditioning and some books about
healthy lifestyle for a general population and older people also.” Well
yeah. Well yeah I can. The the book I usually have people, because I think it’s
a brilliant book. It’s an excellent read. It’s fun to read is Tommy Kono,
the late Tommy Kono’s, book Weightlifting, Olympic Style. I think that is a
foundational book. He took those ABCs of training. It’s, there are so many lessons
that apply to every other sport. It’s worth your time. Very simple, a very simple
book when looking at programming, training and the basics. It
is a rock solid good basics book. If you get a chance to find this book. Now Bill
Hinbern, H-I-N-B-E-R-N, has a site that I think you might want to look at this
book. It’s called the Encyclopedia of Wrestling Conditioning by John Jessee,
J-E-E-S-S-E-E. And what i love about this book is that it is, it’s got everything in there.
It’s got ligament training, tendon training, isometrics. It’s got a million
different grip exercises. It’s a dated book. I’ll grant you that,
but I think it’s brilliant. I always go back to that book when I get a little
confused about things. Let me add another book they might be able to find a used
copy of this, called Staying Supple. Staying Supple by John Jerome and you can find
that usually easily on eBay and some of the others. So those three books, one is
on specifically Olympic lifting, one is on everything you’ll ever
need to know about the weight room and the third mobility flexibility, those are
my favorite three go-tos just as a foundational stuff. Obviously other books
like the DeLorme’s Progressive Resistive Exercise book you
know from 1951ish. Heidegger’s Physiology of Strength. Those
are other books too that I have great respect for okay. When you look at the
healthy lifestyle for general population and older, you might have a hard time
finding this book now but Terry and Jan Todd, T-O-D-D, wrote a book about middle-aged
weight lifting that I thought was excellent. I bought a copy. I’ve had two
copies, loaned out one and never saw it again as as per always, but I thought
that was an excellent book. It has very simple programming in there. They have a
four month cycle that you just keep repeating and it was a massive influence
on Clarence Bass, that “Get Ripped” guy. Now by mentioning Clarence Bass who’s a
bodybuilder, I also think his works are very good. His last few books I’ve been
you know as he’s gotten older, he’s over seventy now, but what’s nice about his
books is he will for example in one of his books, he had two training
sessions a week, two aerobic training sessions for someone my age. Too lifting
sessions, two kind of cardioish sessions. He sometimes will recommend one lifting
session a week which is just you know amazing. What I like about him, is he’s
walked the walk since he was fourteen thirteen years old
so when you look at Clarence Bass’s work I would first suggest you just go to his
website cbass.com. The letter C bass .com and just pour in
there for a while. Now he’s a he’s a bit more of a high intensity training guy.
The old Ellington Darden Arthur Jones stuff and he’s also you know his very
anti-fat but it doesn’t matter because it’s
it’s well worth your time reading. If you can get online and find a copy of Art
DeVany’s original 2002 document Evolutionary Fitness, I thought that was
brilliant for athletes and everybody else okay. And there’s also a brilliant
book called Can You Go? by Dan John and you can find that at On Target
Publications and you if you buy it there, you’ll get the audio of the e-book and
the printed book all in one package and that’s my work on training both elite
athletes and the normal general population. I hope that helped.

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