Proper Weightlifting [NorthOaks.tv Video]

Proper Weightlifting [NorthOaks.tv Video]


Hi my name is Jamey Mroz,
graduate assistant with Southeastern Sport Performance. We’re here today in
conjunction with North Oaks Sports Medicine to go over some proper lifting techniques. Assisting me today is Patrick Cookwell. The first thing we’re going to look at is the bodyweight
squat. You should test the bodyweight squat
before you allow the athlete to step into a bar. This is going to ensure the athlete has
the correct amount of flexibility and ability to squat properly. As you can
see right here athlete’s knee is in a positive angle tracking over the toes. We are actually beyond 90 degrees right now
if you look at the angle of the knee which is what coaches always want.
You want to squat to 90 squat to 90. We’re past 90 right now because we want to created a positive shin angle
with the knee which happens in all athletic fields. Right here as you can see his knees are out
tracking over the toes. His chest is up. His back is flat. His shoulders, his shoulders hips and heels are straight in a line.
We want to keep the back a column and not a bridge. When teaching this squat you want to start with the front squat technique. Using this technique athletes will be able to test their flexibility
mobility going down into a squat. As you can see his
feet are shoulder-width apart, his chest is up, his elbows are high. His weight is placed evenly on his whole foot and his toes are directed outward about 10 degrees. This is going to allow the hips to open so the
athlete can lower his center of gravity without putting extra stress on his back. As you can see the proper depth of the squat is when the hamstring meets the gastroc
muscle. This is gonna ensure that we are low enough and we’re getting a 90 degree angle at the
knee. Our shoulders will stay in line with our hips and our heels. Our knees will
be forward to our toes not beyond. And our chest will be up. As you can see his back is flat. Again, our spine is a column, not a bridge. Here you can
see his knees are tracking outwards over his toes his chest is up and his hips are
sinking down. Now to take a look at the improper technique of a squat. As you can see
the athlete’s first movement was to push his hips back. Right here he is leaning forward. He does not have the flexibility to get down to a proper
squat technique. His spine is being used as a bridge which is putting excess stress on the lumbar spine.
This is something we want to avoid with our young athletes. Another problem that frequently
happens while squatting is adduction our valgus move of the knees. This is when the knees begin to cave
in a squat. As you can see the athlete’s knees are not
tracking over his toes and it’s not a smooth descent like we saw
before. Again, we’ll look at it. The knees begin to cave. As you
can see the knees are not over the toes and his legs are not tracking outwards.
His knees are beginning to cave in. This will cause patella tendinitis
because the patella is not tracking correctly over the knee. This means one of two things: the athlete
is either not flexible enough to squat properly or the weight is too much. Simply decrease weight or get the athlete to stretch. The athlete’s feet are shoulder-width apart, his chest is up, toes are directed about 10 degrees outward. As he begins his descent, his knees will track out over his toes
keeping his chest up balanced on his whole foot, his heels
remain on the floor, and you can see he’s resisting the valgus
motion of the knees. Again chest is up knees over the toes. This is very
important while squatting. As we look at it from the side we can see his shoulders, hips and heels are in a straight line. His knees go out to
his toes and not beyond and his chest is up. And he stands up smoothly. Again from the front, as you can
see the valgus motion of the knees This is very poor while squatting. We need to decrease weight or increase flexibility. This is not good
for the athlete’s knees. As we can see right here the athlete is leaning
forward creating a bridge with his lower back. We
want our spine to be upright and our chest to be tall. This will
keep our spine a column and keep it safe. Our spine is made for
compression not for being a bridge. The first thing he’s doing is moving his
hips back. He’s trying to sit back. We want to sit straight
down. We want our hips to go between the heels
of our feet. As we approach the bar feet should be shoulder-width apart, knees over our toes, and our hands right outside of our knee. We
want to keep our tight our stomach tight, our chest up
and our back flat. As we begin to stand our knees and our hips should move
at the same time. Looking at it from the side we can see our knees are over our toes our chest is up and our back is flat. As we stand up everything moves at the same
time. There’s no buckle. Now we’ll look at a powerlifting dead lift. This is done barefoot and because of the angle changes our hips our hips will
sit higher and we’ll put a lot more stress on our
lower back and hips. The wrong way to do a dead lift is
to let our butt come up before our chest. This is gonna put extra stress on
our lower back and means we should probably drop the
weight. Now we’re going to look at the arteal exercise. As the athlete grips the bar we should have our knees slightly bent, chest up and our back flat. We’re gonna take a deep
breath and tighten our stomach. The initial movement we’re going to
slide our hips backwards. We’re going to keep the bar close to our body and bring it to the middle of our knee. You should
feel a slight stretch in the hamstrings and then we’re going to violently move our hips forward to a standup. Again our knees are slightly bent, we’re gonna move our hips back, and then move our hips forward. We want to make
sure that the back stays flat during this exercise. Now we’re gonna look at power clean. The first thing with the clean is our grip. We wanna use a hook grip where our thumb actually goes underneath our fingers and we’re gonna use that to grip the bar. Our feet should be slightly wider than shoulder-width as if
you’re going to do a vertical jump. You want your chest up, knees bent, back flat and our hips over
our heels. The initial movement we gonna separate
the bar from the ground. We will not rip it off the
ground. We’ll take tension out of the bar and simply extend our knees. Now we’ll lower it
back down. This is a great teaching technique for the athletes go over the initial pull, extend and rebend. Now right now we’re in
the power position. After we extend the knee when the bar gets
beyond our knee we will rebend. This is the power position. When we get to
this position our next movement is going to be to jump laterally. Now let’s see it in real speed. Again we’ll take a look at it full speed. You’ll be able to see the extend, the rebend of the knee and then the jump. Looking at it from the side our back is flat, our chest is up, our hips are
over our heels. What we’re gonna do is extend the knee and then rebend. As you can see the angle of the back and hips
did not change all we did was simply extend the knee. When the bar reaches our knee we’ll then rebend and we’ll now be in the power position. This is the power position. Our back is
flat, our chest is up and our knees are bent. We’re going to jump
using our quads. Now let’s look at it in real speed. One more time. You can see the extend, rebend and violent jump. Now we’ll look at bench press. There are 5 points of contact on the bench. We want to have our head down, our upper back, our glutes and then our right and left feet. When you grip the bar you wanna line up your thumb with the smooth part and then use a closed grip which means you will wrap the thumb. Our shoulder blades will be pinched back and tight then we’ll lower the bar down to the middle part of our chest. We want to make sure our elbows stay tight at a 45 degree angle to our body. We’ll then press and extend our arms. Again, we’ll lower the bar keeping our elbows tight to our body. and extend. This is an inverted row. This is a simple back exercise that you can
put it any weight room. If you have a rack, you can do these. It’s a variation of a upper back exercise which is great for our
high school athletes. We have to remember that keeping our
back healthy will keep our shoulders healthy. We need to
do 2 to 1 ratio of pulls to pushes which means if we bench
press once we should do a dumbbell row or an inverted row or
two back exercises along with that bench press. For this
exercise the athlete is gonna lay underneath the bar. They will use the same grip as a
bench press. They will keep their hips off the
ground and simply pull up. The elbows should be at a 45 degree
angle to the body and their chest will touch the bar. To make this exercise easier the athlete will bend their knees and keep their hips up and they will pull up to the bar. To make it harder you can extend the legs, put the feet up on a box or add weight. A great variation of a back exercise for our young high school athletes.

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