Olympic Gymnast Dominique Dawes On The Purpose Of Pain, Teamwork, & Failing Forward

Olympic Gymnast Dominique Dawes On The Purpose Of Pain, Teamwork, & Failing Forward


Throughout my career, I want I had some great achievements. But there’s an amazing, uh, there’s a pretty spectacular video that I want to show you all that really did not define me, but was, ah, very shining moment for me in my career. That was very painful when I fell and I I embarrassed myself in 1996, in front of fifty thousand people in the Georgia Dome with, I always said to audiences, millions of people watching In the other day, I was doing some research and it was actually 3.5 billion people globally watching, according to the Sports Business Journal. Now all three point five billion weren’t watching gymnastics. Don’t worry about it. Probably just about two or so, because gymnastics is one of the most popular sports during the games. That sucks. You know that. It really sucks. And I remember when I fell and I finished the routine and I ended up on vault and I ended up not in third place but in nineteenth place. But I will say I learned so much more about myself, about my character and about life. Through that painful experience, pain is truly for purpose. What can I get out of this painful situation? How can it help better define my character? How can I grow? How can I then be more compassionate to other people? How can I then love someone differently or bream or empathetic? I mean, just think about the world we live in, and many times you get caught up in your own little bubble. I know I do and I was in a great not comfortable bubble for eighteen years of my career is a gymnast, but just think it was all about my dreams and goals. Now I’m in the real world and I’ve realized there’s a lot of hurt and a lot of pain. And when you start looking beyond yourself, you start growing as an individual, and I started the sport of gymnastics when I was six years old. I made it to my first Olympic Games when I was fifteen, nineteen years old. I made it to my second Olympic Games and I will say the only reason why I won that gold medal with six of the most talented girls. We all chose to check our ego at the door. Now there’s a awesome Michael Jackson song. We are the world. You guys hear about that when they he got all these amazing talents together on the top of the door and said, Check your egos at the door because each and every one of those talents had a large ego and rightfully so. When you kick ass at something, you have the right to have a large ego, right? And so we all had a pretty big ego. I was a national champion in 1994 to think about it. I won all four events. Shana Miller. One way too many national championships. Dominic Luciano was the next Nadia Koman each she had won a national championship. All of these girls rightfully had a very large ego. However, we realize that the 1996 Olympic Games we had the ability to do something that was larger than ourselves, and that common goal was to win a gold medal and something that a women’s team artistic women team had never had the opportunity do before. And in 1992 and we earned a bronze medal, that was the best that we could do back then. But We knew in 1996 we had the caliber team full of so much talent, so much heart. But we decided we’re going to check our ego, not at the door, but at the floor. babumpbump my jokes are horrible. You’ve got to check your ego at the floor, and that’s exactly what we did. We did. Once we had made that team. We trained together in Greensboro, North Carolina, and I realized, Hey, I am making this way too much about me Way too much about me and my teammates felt the same way. It was a very humbling moment for me to recognize. Hey, I needed these girls, you know, and they needed me. And I think whenever you’re working in a team, either in your professional setting or even in your home, you need to recognize when you get in trouble. It’s when your ego takes over looking over it. Amanda, Amanda Bordner, Jaycie Phelps. I could look and say, Hey, they only competed in two events. If you know anything about gymnastics, there’s four bends. The only competed in two events. I did so Much more. All eight of my scores counted. I remember my coach pointing this out to me and agents pointing this out to me. Wow, all eight of your scores counted. If your eight scores weren’t there, you guys would not have made history. And I remember thinking, Oh, but you know what? If their two scores and four scores weren’t there, we would not have made history. So it’s about having that perspective of recognizing. No matter how low someone may seem to you on a totem pole or her high, you may seem on a totem pole, you need each other to achieve your greatest potential. You need each other to achieve that common goal.

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