How Heavy Are The Dumbbells You Lift? | How To Build Muscle – Myth vs Reality

How Heavy Are The Dumbbells You Lift? | How To Build Muscle – Myth vs Reality


Hey guys let’s talk today about how
heavy you need to be lifting in order to build muscle. I’ll give you five reasons
why it’s just not as much as you think it might be, so stay tuned. So yes, you need
to challenge yourself with relatively heavy weight in order to build muscle –
usually about 70 percent of what’s called your 1 rep max. Now that
definitely sounds like it’s a lot of weight, and in some cases it might be or
maybe not. It depends on what that one rep actually looks like – the quality of
the movement. So reason number one for why you don’t need to lift as heavy as
you might think is that usually you’re not generating force that you think you
are when lifting a heavy weight. So let’s take that one step further, so you’ll
understand exactly what I mean by that. When you’re thinking about how much
weight you’re using, you’re looking at it from the opposite direction. You’re
looking at it from the outside. What you really need to be doing is generating as
much force as possible with your target muscle to induce that muscle damage
and metabolic stress; so you need to be thinking more internally. The external
weight of a dumbbell or a barbell or a machine is only providing the resistance
against which you can generate that internal tension that you need. Reason
number two is based directly on reason number one. In order to generate maximal
tension in your muscle you must be able to hold one end of that muscle fixed and
shorten it from the other end. For example, you hold the origins of your
bicep muscle which is on your shoulder blade or scapula – you hold that
end still, while you generate tension and contract and begin to shorten from the
insertion which exists now on your forearm bones. That’s the foundation of
stability at your scapula that is gonna allow your bicep to do maximal work.
Otherwise if both ends of the muscle are moving during a rep you’re not truly
shortening the muscle as much as you can, and that sort of cheating usually
happens when you’re lifting a heavier weight then you’re actually able to
manage and control. Reason number three: Speaking of cheating most people when
they’re lifting a heavy weight are using a number of other muscles than the one
they intend to. So, usually you’re using your delts when you’re doing a bench
press, maybe your legs for a little bit of a hop when you’re doing bicep curls,
maybe your rear delts on some rows, maybe your traps on some lateral
dumbbell raises. There’s almost no point to lifting super heavy when you’re
cheating with other muscles to do the work. It’s better to go lighter, focus
attention where you want it, and stimulate that specific muscle or muscle
group to grow. Reason number four: Your focus is only on shortening the muscle,
or in the concentric phase of each exercise. However, more muscle damage and
therefore more growth potential lies in the eccentric or the negative where your
muscle is generating tension as its lengthening. Think about that for a
second; the eccentric or lowering portion of a bicep curl provides more muscle
building potential than the upward part of the rep that everyone is obsessed
with – just getting the weight up. Well, contracting hard while you’re
lowering it gets you more benefit. Tying reasons 3 & 4 together. Now there’s a
definite benefit in cheating a weight upward if you know what you’re doing, if
you can do it safely, or if you’re, you know using a spotter. If you can remain
in control on the eccentric and reap the benefits of a well controlled negative.
Finally, reason number 5 why lifting heavy is not always the answer –
injury. Injuries result during an exercise when there’s instability around the
joint, which is either deliberately or accidentally involved in a movement. One
of the main sources of joint instability is moving through a range of motion
that’s greater than the range that you can control; and whenever a weight pushes
or pulls you outside of a range you can control with the muscles that you’re
actually intending to use, other and usually smaller and weaker muscles need
to assist in order to stabilize and manage the load around that joint. When
this happens, we also then make sudden moves as an emergency maneuver and
something gives – usually soft tissues like ligaments or tendons but sometimes
full muscle tears. So with those 5 reasons, instead of lifting a super heavy weight,
be sure that first: one you know how to generate tension in the muscle in its
lengthened position, shortened position, and everywhere in between.
Secondly make sure you’re able to remain completely stable with the weight that
you’re using and keep one end of the muscle still while shortening from the other,
and don’t cheat your way through the rep using other muscles. But if you do, have
the help of a spotter. Make sure you’re in control of the negative; and then of
course make the negative of every rep your greatest friend. Finally, stay within
the range of motion that you can control with any given weight.
Stay safe and injury free, and have a long and fun lifting career. Okay guys, so
that’s it for today’s video – pretty short. I hope as always that you found the
information to be useful, and that you actually put this information into
practice to help to build the physique that you’re after. I appreciate all the
support that you guys continue to give to me and I’d love it if you would share
the video with others so that they can benefit as well. Until the next time guys
Aloha from beautiful Hawaii

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